Amalaki A Superfood

 Indian gooseberries

Amalaki also known as Indian gooseberries

 Is Amalaki A Superfood? Perhaps a closer look is in order. For years, health enthusiasts have lived by the age-old motto, “An apple a day keeps the doctor away.” and I for one really enjoy a good fresh apple.  While it’s true that an apple provides ample vitamin C as well as anti-allergenic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-viral benefits, it appears that Amalaki might be an even more powerful fruit that contributes to your overall health.

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 The Amalaki tree, which is primarily found in the tropical areas of Asia, has been cultivated for centuries in gardens and has sprung up as a popular commercial crop that’s grown for medicinal purposes. In India, among  Ayurvedic practitioners it is considered the most powerful rejuvenating medicine available from nature and is used to treat many different conditions.

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The fruit  also known as Indian gooseberry is used whole and as a dried substance in medicinal treatments that provide relief from stress. Its antioxidants have been touted as something far more powerful than the vitamin C found in an apple and will  provide 20 times more vitamin C per glass than fresh squeezed orange juice.

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The Amalaki fruit is also used as an anti-inflammatory when the extract is removed from the leaves of the same tree. It provides an anti-fungal and anti-microbial attribute when used topically.

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Cancer studies in mice have shown that the Amalaki fruit reduces the effects that cancer cells have on ravishing the body and when used prior to radiation, offers a protective shield to damaging the chromosomes.

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During medical studies conducted on rabbits, Amalaki had a cholesterol-reducing effect on rabbits whose numbers were elevated over a 60-day time frame. This provides overall health benefits to the body’s cardiovascular system as a whole.

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Even the digestive system appears to receive positive benefits from the consumption of the Amalaki fruit or its extracts. One study found that the extract reduced inflammation and irritation normally found with digestive diseases.

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Like many other potent antioxidants, the Amalaki fruit contributes to a boost in your immune system. Life-spans in mice subject to tumors increased by up to 25% with the consumption of this extract.

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No warnings have been given about the Amalaki fruit to date. It’s been used freely in India for centuries as a medicinal food known for its immense health benefits. Other conditions for which it’s used include constipation, colic, asthma, anemia, gout, and even mental disorders.

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 It is reported to be the only food that contains five of the six essential tastes: sour, sweet, bitter, pungent and astringent. It lacks the salty taste.

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Today, you can get the benefits of Amalaki in power or tablet form. From the powder, you can make a tea to drink on a regular basis to get the most health benefits from your daily consumption.

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I am using it as a tea although it is also available in capsules, I already have enough of those in my life. I purchase an organic tea which you can find at http://amzn.to/J4F2Mc if you are interested. That is also my affiliate link so I would make a couple of cents if you should purchase using it, which would be nice but more importantly for those planning on making the new year a healthier one, this might be a food to consider and might even be available at your local health food store.

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 Is Amalaki A Superfood ? From the reports I have been reading, I believe it is and that we will be hearing more about it in the coming months. However You should always consult a medical professional before taking anything for a medical condition. This article is only to show some of the reported benefits that a person might receive from this fruit. And I must include that These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

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In an article in Mother Earth News a few years back I found the problem with getting gooseberries in the states. It states “the federal government banned the cultivation of gooseberries in the 1930s. Back then, loggers were convinced the gooseberry bush was helping to spread white pine blister rust, a disease threatening timber crops at the time. It’s been 33 years since the ban was lifted and it’s still hard to find gooseberries in stores, especially outside of a New England.”  None the less, they are making a comeback and perhaps we will seem more of them before lone.

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Mother Earth did point out that you can grow your own, so for my friend Amy in Nebeaka, 20922077_shere is what they said “Pixwell is a common American variety and is widely available through mail order nurseries. They are hardy, productive and almost thornless, but the fruit quality is not as good as some of the less common varieties. The Welcome variety, on the other hand, has better flavor than the Pixwell and produces medium-sized wine-red fruit. Another common gooseberry, the Hinnonmaki Red, produces an abundance of delicious red fruit and is mildew resistant.”

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Reports show that those grown here in the states are also loaded with all the goodness of the Indian berry, so if you have a place to grow them, this might be a nice item to add to your garden.

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If you like cooking with spices, my book Spices In The Kitchen can be found on Amazon, at: http://chefwilliamlikes.me/Spices In The Kitchen. and contains information on spices as well as recipes.

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CHEF WILLIAM ColorEat Healthy, Laugh Often and Enjoy Life~

Healthy Food choices

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2 Responses to Amalaki A Superfood

  1. Alana
    Twitter:
    says:

    They have just this year started to sell gooseberries in a local farmer’s market here in the Binghamton, New York area. I admit to not being attracted to them in the past and yes, I remember when we were unable to buy the plants where I live. I don’t have room on my small plot of land. I may change my mind about trying to eat them, though.
    Alana recently posted..The Obsolete Christmas Eve Surprise and the Wreaths of ChristmasMy Profile

  2. Now, this is one about which I’ve never heard…Amalaki…probably because, as you said, it was banned from cultivation. Now to see what MOM (mother’s organic market) has in inventory…
    Thanks!
    Roy A. Ackerman, Ph.D., E.A. recently posted..Thoughts for Today…My Profile

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