Fall Produce Guide To Farmers Markets

Healthy foodFall Produce Guide To Farmers Markets, for Food In Season In Your Region. My wife and I have been eating nothing
but foods we purchased from the local farmers market for the past two weeks, and plan to continue doing it until we start our trip to Mexico in a couple of weeks

There’s certain times of the year that seem to bring out the inner-gardener in all of us, even when we don’t have a plot of land to dig around in.  If you are lucky enough to live close to a farmers market, you don’t have to plant your own garden to enjoy the bounty of the land. Here’s a look at what foods you will find in the different areas of the United States during the Autumn season. There are of course more available than I have mentioned here, so be sure to visit one or more in your area

Midwest

When you think of wide-open spaces, rolling hills, fall colors, woods, rivers, lakes, and Fresh Vegetablesstreams, you are probably thinking of the Midwest. The climate in this region is perfect for the fall produce that you see most often featured in pictures depicting a bountiful Autumn. During the fall season in the Midwest, depending on which area you find yourself in, you can buy fruits and veggies like apples, celery, cauliflower, broccoli, leeks, pumpkins, beets, and turnips at the local markets. Corn is available at roadside stands through out the country side. Look to the fields and you will see the cabbage being harvested daily.

You may not be as familiar with some of the other produce harvested during the cool fall season, such as parsnips, kale, rutabaga, and eggplant. Some of your favorite hearty staples are also found in the Midwest regions during the fall; bountiful crops such as home grown onionspotatoes, squash, onions, and carrots. Probably the oddest piece of produce that you will see come out of the Midwest during the fall months is the persimmon, which is a tart little bite that will have you craving more. And don’t forget the cranberry.  Where would we be without our cranberry on the Autumn table!  Look for all of these fall favorites anytime before the first hard frost in the coldest regions of the Midwest.

Northeast

The Northeast areas are generally surrounded by masses of water so they are typically known for their seafood and other types of game.  However, this region also has farms that are busy producing some of the best produce to ever hit your table. These regions give us beets, Brussels sprouts, cranberries, grapes, onions, nectarines, and even rutabaga.

Looking to try something different, but still fresh in the Northeast region? Perhaps you can give chicory, escarole, pluots or some radicchio a try this fall. Pluots are amazing Fresh Herbs and vegetableshybrids between a plum and an apricot, and they should definitely be on your list of foods to try this year.  So, when you think of the northeast, don’t just think about lobster; think about all the wonderful produce that region has to offer, as well.

Southeast

Known for its ‘down home’ style of cooking, many of the ingredients you find in the recipes have their roots right in the area. For instance, during the cooler months, you can find sweet potatoes, tomatillos, collard greens, figs, okra, pecans, mustard greens,

Farmer Market

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kale greens, and green beans.  And don’t forget the fruit.  Citrus is a welcome addition to any table as the fall months move into winter as well as wonderful fresh peaches.

The crops in the South during the fall often dictate the menu for many a meal during holidays and family get-togethers.  Pecan pie just screams Southern comfort food.  Sweet potato casserole and a pot of collard greens is on every southern table during the fall season.  Fall may come a little later in this region, but the produce is perfectly timed to make Southerners delighted over big piles of greens and baskets of brightly colored sweet citrus at their local farmers markets.

Northwest

The Northwest region of the United States tends to have a more consistent climate throughout the year which makes it a prime growing region for some of the more delicate fruits and veggies. With a temperate climate that has a considerable amount of rainfall, you can expect produce that likes to stay cool and shaded to grow in this region.

During the fall months you will find boysenberries, huckleberries, artichokes, kiwi, mint, sage, basil,  watercress, and rosemary in fresh abundance. Other produce you will find in this region includes chard, beets, Brussels sprouts, celery, and arugula. If it doesn’t like direct sun, and loves lots of moisture, you’ll find it in the Northeast.  But, wait.  I almost forgot one of the biggest crops you’ll find in the northwest; apples. How could I forget apples, as a teenager, I earned my money for school cloths during the grape and the apple harvests in Northern California.  Along with pears, apples are a very abundant crop in the northwest.  If you want to buy a iStock_000002267826XSmallvariety of apples and learn a million ways to eat them, go to a farmers market in the northwest.  You will not be disappointed.

No matter what your appetite during the fall months, there is some region of the United States that is bound to have a local farmers market with the fresh produce you are looking for. Now the trick is trying to figure out how to get there and back in time for dinner!

If you would like to learn about using herbs in your kitchen, my kindle book Herbs In The Kitchen is available at: http://chefwilliamlikes.me/The Herb Book

This books contain information on herbs as well as some recipes to introduce you to some you may have not been using. I hope you will enjoy them as much as I did when I was testing the recipes for the book.

Chef WilliamEat Healthy, Laugh Often and Enjoy Life~

Healthy Food choices

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